Kiss by Alex Murawski

A shy boy has never been kissed. But when his best friend offers his girlfriend to practice with, his desires suddenly awaken.

Tom, a young introverted teenager, has never been kissed. His best friend offers his girlfriend to practice with, but when Tom begins to have feelings for her, it changes the trio’s friendship forever during a party one night.

Director Alex Murawski’s short drama is intimate and even tender, focused on the quiet subterranean feelings that underlie the activity of everyday life.

With an emotionally acute script and hypnotic, even dreamlike camerawork, the film is alive to the currents of desire and longing that flow between characters, even when they do their best to hide them. The performances are subtle and underplayed, but convey enormous emotion with simple glances and gestures. The situation between the teens could be played for melodrama or crassness, but instead is treated with a sense of both poetry and realism.

As a result, “Kiss” is a sensitive, beautifully drawn entry in the teen drama genre, conveying the emotional turbulence and awakenings of this time of life with patience, intelligence and respect.




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